March Glen Canyon Lecture Series

“What Has Passed and What Remains: Oral Histories of Northern Arizona’s Changing Landscapes”  presented by Peter Friederici

Wednesday, March 21, 2012, 7:00 pm at the Carl Hayden Visitor Center at Glen Canyon Dam

The land is awash in stories: though unseen, they are still potent.  All over northern Arizona, experiences of place have shaped people and land.  We remember those experiences with stories.  They are stories about the weather and the neighbors, about animals and plants, about work and play, about time-honored traditions and hard times.  We tell them around campfires and kitchen tables, on long drives and in public hearings.  Ultimately they are stories about us, for who we are is ultimately inseparable from where we live.  It is to capture these stories for the future that the Ecological Oral Histories project has been recording narratives of long-time observers of life in northern Arizona.

Since 2005 “What Has Passed and What Remains” has recorded dozens of digital video interviews with people from all over northern Arizona.  Most of the interviews have been conducted by students from numerous disciplines, including history, English, anthropology, environmental studies, sustainability studies, and more.  The interviews are professionally transcribed, and video and print versions are archived at the Colorado Plateau Digital Archives at Northern Arizona University’s Cline Library.  The project has also worked to make parts of the interviews available through a book, publications in popular media, and a multimedia exhibit at the Pioneer Museum in Flagstaff..

Peter Friederici is an award-winning freelance journalist who writes about science, nature, and the environment from his home in Arizona.  His articles, essays, and books tell stories of people, places, and the links between them.

Admission is free.  The Glen Canyon lecture Series is sponsored by Glen Canyon Natural History Association, Powell Museum, and Page Public Library.

 

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